Conference registration: The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.900-c.1500

In a few weeks, I will be speaking on ‘Praying Before the Cross in the Late Anglo-Saxon Church’ at a two-day conference, ‘The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.900-c.1500’, at the University of York (2nd-3rd September).  I will be speaking about prayer in front of crosses in a few of the manuscripts that I … More Conference registration: The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.900-c.1500

Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

It’s early July.  Up here in North Yorkshire, there is daylight for over seventeen hours in every twenty-four, the sun is shining (intermittently), and two thousand medievalists are heading in our direction from all over the world.  This can only mean one thing: the Leeds International Medieval Congress. Leeds is the second-largest medieval conference in … More Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

CFP: The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland c.900–c.1500 (University of York, 2–3 September 2016)

  Deadline: 30 March 2016 now extended to 18 April 2016 King’s Manor, University of York The rood – understood as the cross itself, and/or the image of Christ crucified – was central to the visual and devotional culture of medieval Christianity. By the late middle ages, a rood was present in monumental form, either … More CFP: The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland c.900–c.1500 (University of York, 2–3 September 2016)