Have mercy on me, O God: Psalm 50 in the Anglo-Saxon church

I have a new article out!  ‘Which Psalms Were Important to the Anglo-Saxons? The Psalms in Tenth- and Eleventh-Century Prayer and Medical Remedies’ is part of a special edition of English Studies on the psalms in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo -Norman England, edited by Helen Appleton and Francis Leneghan, and I am grateful to both of … More Have mercy on me, O God: Psalm 50 in the Anglo-Saxon church

New article published: ‘Which Psalms Were Important to the Anglo-Saxons? The Psalms in Tenth- and Eleventh-Century Prayer and Medical Remedies’

My latest article is now available online in a special issue of English Studies! ‘Which Psalms Were Important to the Anglo-Saxons? The Psalms in Tenth- and Eleventh-Century Prayer and Medical Remedies’ English Studies, 98:1 (2017): 35-48 This article examines the use of the Psalms in sixteen short prayer programmes, found in tenth- and eleventh-century English … More New article published: ‘Which Psalms Were Important to the Anglo-Saxons? The Psalms in Tenth- and Eleventh-Century Prayer and Medical Remedies’

‘This land is so hard it maketh unlusty and irked!’ Mankind and motivation

Hello.  This is a post about the late medieval play called Mankind.  I appeared in HIDden Theatre‘s productions of it in November 2015 and April 2016 and had absolutely every intention of writing blogposts about the play at both those times.  Honest.  I just never quite got around to it. Today, the sixth of September, … More ‘This land is so hard it maketh unlusty and irked!’ Mankind and motivation

Conference registration: The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.900-c.1500

In a few weeks, I will be speaking on ‘Praying Before the Cross in the Late Anglo-Saxon Church’ at a two-day conference, ‘The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.900-c.1500’, at the University of York (2nd-3rd September).  I will be speaking about prayer in front of crosses in a few of the manuscripts that I … More Conference registration: The Rood in Medieval Britain and Ireland, c.900-c.1500

The scribe, the editors, and the well-dressed Elizabethan: a day with an 11th-century psalter

As I mentioned in my post on an Old English confessional prayer, I recently visited the British Library to visit the manuscript known as Cotton Tiberius A. iii, which was a sort of ‘supporting actor’ in my thesis.  A similar role was played by an eleventh-century psalter, known as the Eadui Psalter and with the … More The scribe, the editors, and the well-dressed Elizabethan: a day with an 11th-century psalter

Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

It’s early July.  Up here in North Yorkshire, there is daylight for over seventeen hours in every twenty-four, the sun is shining (intermittently), and two thousand medievalists are heading in our direction from all over the world.  This can only mean one thing: the Leeds International Medieval Congress. Leeds is the second-largest medieval conference in … More Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

Welcome! A retrospective on eight months of blogging

Ever since WordPress very kindly featured my post Like, pray, share: Anglo-Saxon prayer memes on their ‘Discover’ page, I have gained a lot of new followers.  This post is for those of you who would like a quick introduction to the kinds of things that I write about. My main subject of study is private … More Welcome! A retrospective on eight months of blogging