The way of the book and the way of the wild: a review of Paul Kingsnorth’s The Wake

there is ways to see this world i saes.  there is the way of the boc and the way of the wilde there is the god of the boc and the gods of the mere there is the way of the crist and the eald ways of this land Paul Kingsnorth, The Wake, p. 334 Be … More The way of the book and the way of the wild: a review of Paul Kingsnorth’s The Wake

Strange beings: translating some Exeter Riddles

I saw four strange beings travel together: black were their tracks, very dark traces.  Fast on its journey, bolder than birds, it flew in the air, dived beneath the waves.  The labouring fighter suffered restlessly, he who shows all four of them the paths over ornamented gold. The four strange beings, if you were wondering, … More Strange beings: translating some Exeter Riddles

Let your works be dead: the haunting House of Fame

In the summer of 2002, in preparation for my final-year university module on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, I started reading a rather odd sort of poem.  The House of Fame made little immediate impact on me, other than the image of a magnificent (and truculent) eagle bearing the poet up to the heavens and … More Let your works be dead: the haunting House of Fame

Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

It’s early July.  Up here in North Yorkshire, there is daylight for over seventeen hours in every twenty-four, the sun is shining (intermittently), and two thousand medievalists are heading in our direction from all over the world.  This can only mean one thing: the Leeds International Medieval Congress. Leeds is the second-largest medieval conference in … More Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress