Let your works be dead: the haunting House of Fame

In the summer of 2002, in preparation for my final-year university module on the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, I started reading a rather odd sort of poem.  The House of Fame made little immediate impact on me, other than the image of a magnificent (and truculent) eagle bearing the poet up to the heavens and … More Let your works be dead: the haunting House of Fame

Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

It’s early July.  Up here in North Yorkshire, there is daylight for over seventeen hours in every twenty-four, the sun is shining (intermittently), and two thousand medievalists are heading in our direction from all over the world.  This can only mean one thing: the Leeds International Medieval Congress. Leeds is the second-largest medieval conference in … More Where does a drunk priest enchant a foxglove? At the Leeds International Medieval Congress

When research meets reality: Anglo-Saxons in the present day

When all of the people that you are studying died around a millennium or so ago, it’s easy to feel far removed from your subject matter. Every now and then, however, something pops up to make me think that the Anglo-Saxon era was not so long ago after all – though perhaps none of these … More When research meets reality: Anglo-Saxons in the present day